Mediterranean Buddha Bowls

These Mediterranean Buddha bowls are gorgeous, healthy, quick to pull together, and packed with different textures and flavors. Make them your own by adding/substituting whatever you have on hand.

I’ll be honest, I never thought this site would ever have a recipe as faddy-sounding as a Buddha bowl. Still, I can’t deny that, by definition, that’s pretty much what this is, so here we are! I didn’t set out to make a Buddha bowl though. I just felt like eating a bowlful of my favorite Mediterranean ingredients, and I love how it turned out! Let’s break it down.

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Overhead view of a Mediterranean Buddha bowl with vegetables, couscous, hummus and tzatziki

You can definitely look at this as a template, because it’s infinitely adaptable. I used couscous scented with turmeric because I love the texture, flavor, and color, and well, it takes 5 minutes to make. But a grain like quinoa, or brown rice for instance would have been great too, and are somewhat healthier choices, since couscous is a pasta rather than a grain.

The veggies can really be anything you have on hand. In this case they are raw, chopped veggies, since I was going for something really fresh, but you can totally use leftover grilled or roasted vegetables.

A Mediterranean Buddha bowl with vegetables, couscous, hummus and tzatziki

I added hummus and tzatziki but you could do one or the other, or try plain yogurt or tahini, or a mix of both (hmmm. yum). I normally add olives and feta to anything mediterranean-inspired, but felt it had enough going on already.

This was SO quick to pull off. Here’s the step-by-step.

How to Make Mediterranean Buddha Bowls

  1. Start with the couscous so it can cool while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. Place the couscous, turmeric and salt in a medium bowl, pour boiling water over it and stir. Cover and let stand for about 5 mins until all the water is absorbed and the couscous is tender. Fluff with a fork. Set aside or refrigerate to cool, tossing occasionally to cool faster.

uncoooked couscous in a glass bowl with turmeric sprinkled on top

2. Whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, honey (or maple syrup for a vegan alternative), minced garlic, oregano, salt and pepper and set aside.

Lemon dressing whisked together in a small glass bowl with ingredients for the dressing all around on a wooden cutting board.

3. Chop the vegetables and parsley and toss them in a large bowl with the chickpeas.

chopped tomato red pepper, cucumber and parsley on a wooden cutting board. Next to it, same ingredients in a glass bowl with chickpeas.

4. Toss the vegetables and chickpeas with the lemon dressing.

Chopped vegetables and chickpeas tossed with lemon dressing for a Mediterranean Buddha bowl.

5. Divide the couscous between four bowls, divide the vegetables between them, top with a scoop of tzatziki and a scoop of hummus, and garnish with chopped parsley and sliced radishes.

Closeup of a Mediterranean Buddha bowl with couscous, raw vegetables, tzatziki and hummus

That’s it! These are perfect for lunch or a light, fresh dinner anytime of year. You can serve them with pitas or flatbreads to bulk them up a bit for dinner.

Enjoy! xx

Sound good to you? If you make these Mediterranean Buddha bowls, I would be thrilled and honored if you would take a pic and tag me on Instagram @ourhappymess!

Or pin for later! ↓↓↓

Closeup of a Mediterranean Buddha bowl with couscous, raw vegetables, tzatziki and hummus

A couple more fresh and Mediterranean-Inspired salads

Greek Salad

Mediterranean Israeli Couscous Salad

Curried Couscous Salad

Products I Used to Make these Mediterranean Buddha Bowls

Overhead view of a Mediterranean Buddha bowl with vegetables, couscous, hummus and tzatziki
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Mediterranean Buddha Bowls

These Mediterranean Buddha bowls are gorgeous, healthy, quick to pull together, and packed with different textures and flavors.

Course Lunch, Main Dish
Cuisine Mediterranean
Keyword bowl, buddha bowl, couscous bowl, power bowl
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Calories 521 kcal
Author Ann

Ingredients

Couscous

  • 1 cup dry couscous
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup boiling water

Lemon Dressing

  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon honey or maple syrup for vegan
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • salt and pepper to taste

Salad

  • 1 red pepper chopped into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1/2 cucumber chopped into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1 15 oz can chickpeas
  • 2 green onions thinly sliced
  • 4 tablespoons parsley
  • 2 radishes thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup hummus store bought or homemade
  • 1/2 cup tzatziki store bought or homemade

Instructions

  1. Make the couscous: In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil. In a medium bowl stir together the dry couscous, turmeric, and salt. Pour the boiling water over the couscous, cover and let sit for about 5 minutes, until the water is absorbed and the couscous is tender. Fluff with a fork and set aside or put in the fridge to cool.

  2. Make the dressing: In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, honey, oregano, garlic, salt, and pepper.

  3. In a large bowl, combine the chopped tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, parsley, green onions, and chickpeas. Add the dressing and stir to combine.

  4. Divide the couscous between four bowls, add the vegetables, and top with tzatziki and hummus. Garnish with sliced radishes and chopped parsley.

Nutrition Facts
Mediterranean Buddha Bowls
Amount Per Serving
Calories 521 Calories from Fat 207
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 23g 35%
Saturated Fat 4g 20%
Cholesterol 5mg 2%
Sodium 729mg 30%
Potassium 721mg 21%
Total Carbohydrates 66g 22%
Dietary Fiber 11g 44%
Sugars 8g
Protein 16g 32%
Vitamin A 41%
Vitamin C 95.7%
Calcium 13.5%
Iron 23.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.



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